Alana Springsteen Closes Chapter with ‘History of Breaking Up (Part Two)

With her honest and authentic storytelling, Alana Springsteen has continued to cement her place as one of country music’s artists to watch with her brand new project, History of Breaking Up (Part Two). Springsteen shines as a storyteller and lets her top tier songwriting chops come to the forefront throughout the eight track project which closes the story started in History of Breaking Up (Part One). Springsteen’s ability to relate with listeners on a deep and personal level is just a part of what makes her such a special and intriguing artist to watch.

PHOTO CREDIT: ANNA CLARY / PROJECT ART: BRIANNE FARQUHAR
 

While You’re At It opens the project on a lovely note, as Springsteen is caught up in the buzz of new love and the mindless romanticism that accompanies it. While a song is a rarity from Springsteen, While You’re At It, is a beautiful one and the perfect prelude for the heartbreak to follow.

Caught reminiscing about what was and foolishly wondering what could still be, Close To Me, features a caught in the middle Springsteen, holding on to any little shred of love left behind. Whether it’s drinking whiskey or checking on her ex’s favorite sports team, Springsteen acts out of character in hopes of finding any little spark that could revive a love gone cold.

Me Myself and Why is one of if not the most relatable song on the album. As her moving on finally starts to gain some traction Springsteen lets her ex back in and is left kicking herself and wondering just why she gave in knowing full well she’d be regretting it come the morning. Springsteen’s self reflection is deeply vulnerable and the all too relatable lyric for so many is one of the most resonant moments on the project. Springsteen’s willingness to show off some of the messier parts of moving on adds a dynamic to Me Myself and Why that elevates it to the upper echelon.

Trust Issues is the meeting point of sass and sheer brilliance. A fed up Springsteen takes the time to issue a long overdue, and highly facetious letter of gratitude to the man, or better yet boy, that left her with Trust Issues. Springsteen brings the house down as she amplifies the attitude with her always pristine vocals.

You Are gets listeners in their feelings as Springsteen sees her ex moving on while she’s still stuck reminiscing about what they had. Springsteen is left with nothing but questions as she contemplates her broken heart and why this relationship seemingly meant more to her than it did her ex. Springsteen’s vocal on You Are is one of the standout moments on a project full of outstanding moments both vocally and lyrically.

That Was All You is my favorite song on the project. In a way That Was You works as an inverse to Me Myself and Why, as Springsteen wonders why she let this man come in and leave her heart in smithereens. Even though she is normally slow to fall, Springsteen found herself falling head over heels with no parachute or way to catch herself, and she is left holding the bag filled with her broken heart, all while her ex continues to live his life without remorse.

New Number is a truly remarkable and breathtakingly refreshing take on the trials and tribulations of moving on when your ex is only a tap of a finger away. Springsteen pleads with her ex to get a New Number because she simply can’t move with those 10 digits etched squarely in her brain, taking up a residence they refuse to relinquish. Springsteen’s vocal is tender and allows listeners to feel this pain along with her.

History of Breaking Up closes the project and puts an authoritative stamp on the extremely well rounded two part project. Springsteen can’t handle her ex’s mood swings in the wake of their breakup, and the way he keeps on pulling her back in just to push her away once more, leading Springsteen to ingeniously say “In the History of Breaking Up tell me has anyone ever been so bad at this.” Springsteen is trying to leave the toxicity of the hot and cold relationship behind, and this contemplative track is the encapsulation of the emotion behind the entirety of the masterfully put together two part project.

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