Cash Crawford Learns to Find Her Own Happiness on ‘Save Myself’

When relationships dissolve, it’s incredibly easy to place the blame at the feet of others, regardless of whether this blame is justified or not. Cash Crawford’ new single, Save Myself explores this paradigm, as Crawford comes to terms with her own misdoings that led to the relationship’s end. Crawford is left with a profound understanding and the lesson that she cannot allow her happiness to be dependent on the opinions or actions of others. Instead, she must learn to be make her own happiness in order to avoid falling back into the same patterns that have left her feeling empty before.

Recently we had the chance to chat with Crawford about her musical journey, background, new single, and more!

Worlds of Country 

When did you know that music was the thing for you?

Cash 

Well, I’ve been singing since I was in diapers. It’s never really not been a thing for me if that makes any sense. I’ve kind of always saying to anybody who had Listen, or and I’ve been writing songs since I was a little kid. So, I think it’s kind of innately in me and always has been.

Worlds of Country 

Was there a moment where you realize that this was something you could pursue seriously, or was it more of a natural evolution?

Cash 

I think both. I think the natural evolution kind of happened with me trying to figure out my own journey in it. And my own way, because I mean, there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Everybody’s ways different, right. But I think the moment for me that I knew that I absolutely wanted to do like to be on stage and create music for a living was the very first concert I went to it was Garth Brooks. And I was watching him run around on the stage and sing songs and just have the crowd go wild. And I was like, that is exactly what I want to do with my life.  When did you make the leap and move out to Nashville?

 I had been back and forth a couple of times. But I officially came for one month in August of 2016. And I never went home. So, and I’m Canadian. So that’s like that’s a little bit of a difficult thing I drove down here I had a 97 Gold Mazda Protege, I had two suitcases in the back. And I was only supposed to be here for a month. So, I just figured out a way to make it work and make and like be able to stay and make a living doing what I’m doing. And you know, get all the paperwork and stuff in process. So, I could legally stay here and then. And then it’s just kind of all fell into place year after year after that.

Worlds of Country 

So what would you say have been some of the bigger lessons you’ve learned over time in Nashville?

Cash 

That burnout is a real thing. That you need to pace yourself and it’s okay to take your time and making sure that you take lots of rest keep your health in order. Also, that you don’t have to conform to the things that other people, other people think you should be doing. As far as your art is concerned. I’ve found that the more authentic I stand in my art and doing what feels good for me, and what feels right for my journey. The more people resonate with that than if I’m trying to be something I’m not. How difficult of a lesson was that for you to learn to sort of stop playing that copycat game and to embrace your own true art? I think that has happened after like the lockdowns after all of COVID shutting everything down and music kind of being taken away and really having to sit and get to know myself a little bit better. I would say this, the songs that I’m coming out with right now are probably the most true and the most authentic to me, but I had to go through some stuff. I had to wade through some stuff to get there. It was a bit of a journey. And I think that’s kind of what helped me really find my own sound and really understand that I don’t need to conform that there’s space for everybody to do their original stuff.

Worlds of Country 

How would you describe your musical style?

Cash 

 I feel like I tend to pull from a few different influences, and I obviously want to be exactly who I am. But I think we all have a few influences. And it just really depends on who I’m listening to. Sometimes I’m writing John Mayer style songs, sometimes it’s very Chris Stapleton, sometimes it’s Adele or Alicia Keys. Sometimes it’s very Kings of Leon, it just kind of depends on what I’m listening to.

Worlds of Country 

So how do you sort of merge or separate all those different influences from one?

Cash 

I don’t know if I do. I mean, I’d certainly try but I feel like you know, like, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with having like a John Mayer guitar lick and some Fleetwood Mac style harmonies then like, you know, some big giant Adele style notes with that rasp of Chris Stapleton and I feel like that’s a really good bowl of soup to have, you know what I mean? So your new single save myself, can you tell us the story behind that song and how that song came together? Yeah, so I was back up in Canada during COVID. And just kind of going through a lot of stuff. Like I was saying, before, I ended up kind of having to put music on hold for a little while. And it’s a big part of my identity. So I kind of felt lost and who I was I went through a bad breakup, that was a very quick relationship. But I fell very hard because I was in a bad place and I shouldn’t have been dating in first place to be completely honest.  But I did, and it happened. I put a lot of pressure on that relationship, because I was looking for somebody else to be my happiness and looking for somebody else to kind of be my escape from the fact that I didn’t know who I was at the moment. And so it imploded. And, and it was learning about the fact that I couldn’t blame him for that, because I would have run for the hills as well, if the tables had been turned. So this kind of taking responsibility for my actions, and the fact that I was a big part of the reason why that ended. And, you know, learning to be that or learning to be my own hero, like if he couldn’t rescue me, and he’s not responsible to it’s not his job, it’s my job to make sure that I’m healthy and safe and taken care of, and that I create my own happiness.

Worlds of Country 

Was it difficult for you to sort of access that vulnerable side of yourself?

Cash

  I think when the pain is still there, yes, absolutely. Because it’s hard to look, when we’re still hurting, it’s hard to look at where our fault is, and that, but once the pain had subsided, and I had kind of started to work through it, I mean, talk therapy helped me with that, I really had to kind of like dig in and figure out where my patterns were that I didn’t want it to repeat. And so I had to fix those things. And so then it became easier. The more I looked at it, the more I worked through it, the easier it became. But initially, when that sting was still there, oh, my goodness, I wasn’t even interested in it.

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